Lampin Machines Precision Parts for TSA Detection Devices - Lampin Corporation

Lampin has been contracted to machine precision components for a company supplying hand-held detection machines for the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) and the (European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA). The devices are used in airport terminals as part of the mandated screening processes required before allowing passengers to proceed to their gates.

Lampin contributed a number of very high-tolerance, dimensionally-complex parts to this important project, including tight-tolerance electrodes and corona faces that make up the heart of the unit. The units feature proprietary technology enabling users to reprogram them in the field. This unique feature means the devices are capable of sensing any chemical substance they are programmed to “smell” and allows them to be used interchangeably for a much wider variety of tasks.

This contract came about when an engineer working for the client company observed parts coming from a certain vendor were routinely failing inspection. Being familiar with Lampin’s reputation for effective engineering and extreme precision machine work, their engineer was successful in influencing the client in question to reach out to Lampin for support.

Lampin’s ability to engage the customer, to fully understand their key requirements, and reliably perform to these high specifications were ultimately the competitive advantages that won the day. Lampin was, in fact, able to ship an initial rush order to quickly relieve a production bottleneck, and the relationship has grown closer ever since.

The contract specifies thousands of hand-held explosive detection units, which could be worth over $100 million dollars in total. “This is great opportunity to put our precision machining to the test,” said Jay Milender, Director of Sales. “We pride ourselves on delivering the best quality parts in the market and we are excited to be helping with such a critical national security project.”

Eventually, thousands of these detection devices will be distributed to airports across the United States, Europe, China and Russia.